Four to Seven Months

There are many milestones in an infant’s physical, emotional and learning development during the four to seven months period. Each baby is individual, and developmental milestones should not be compared. Babies can reach milestones early or late.

Physical Milestones of a Four to Seven Month Old Infant

  • Infants will be able to push their heads and shoulders up.
  • Infants will learn to roll from back to side, and then they will learn to roll from stomach to back.
  • Infants will learn to pull their feet to their mouth and play or chew on toes.
  • Infants may sit unsupported for a brief period of time.
  • Infants will be able to hold an object in their hands and bring it to their mouths. They will eventually learn to pass an object from one hand to the other.
  • Infants in this age group will start drooling and teething.

Learning Milestones of a Four to Seven Month Old Infant

  • Infants in this age group will coo and gurgle and gradually start making consonant sounds. This will be preceded by the infant’s imitation of sounds.
  • Infants will start reaching out for objects they want and link certain sounds with objects.
  • Infants in this age group like looking in the mirror, and they can examine things for longer periods of time.
  • Infants will look down when they drop something.

Emotional Milestones of a Four to Seven Month Old Infant

  • Infants in this age group will start to laugh, soon to be followed with chuckling when excited.
  • Infants tend to not cry as much as before as they have found other ways to communicate their wants and needs.
  • Infants in this age group will fuss and be demanding if they feel their needs are not being met.
  • Infants will smile at themselves when they look in the mirror. They will also smile at other babies.
  • By seven months, infants in this age group can hold out their arms when they want to be picked up or hugged.
  • Infants in this age group will squeal and wiggle excitedly when they are stimulated by caregivers or something they favor.

 When to Contact the Pediatrician

You should contact your child’s pediatrician if your child is showing any of the following signs or conditions:

  • Infant does not turn toward sounds or react to bright lights.
  • Infant does not follow caregiver or objects with their eyes.
  • Infant does not smile.
  • Infant is unable to grasp and hold onto an object.
  • Infant does not roll.
  • Infant cannot hold head upright without assistance.

Eight to Twelve Months

There are many milestones in an infant’s physical, emotional and learning development during the eight to twelve month period. Each baby is an individual, and developmental milestones should not be compared. Babies can reach milestones early or late.

Physical Milestones of an Eight to Twelve Month Old Infant

  • Infants will be able to sit alone without support.
  • Infants can bang on tables or other surfaces with an object.
  • Infants will start crawling, either with their abdomen on, or off, of the floor.
  • Infants will learn to pull themselves up to a standing position, and eventually stand alone.
  • Infants will learn how to change positions, such as going from lying to sitting.
  • Infants can learn to drink from a cup.

Learning Milestones of an Eight to Twelve Month Old Infant

  • Infants in this age group will begin to make vowel and consonant cooing sounds.
  • Infants may start shouting to get their caregiver’s attention.
  • Older infants may say one syllable words, or a combination of the same syllable, such as “mama” or “dada.”
  • Infants will imitate actions they see, such as holding a spoon or playing with a toy.
  • Infants in this age group may be curious about a toy that is being hidden and start looking for it.
  • Infants will drop things on purpose to see it fall.

Emotional Milestones of an Eight to Twelve Month Old Infant

  • Infants in this age group will start to show fear around individuals they are unfamiliar with.
  • Infants in this age group tend to cry and appear scared when parents leave them with another caregiver.
  • Infants in this age group will laugh more frequently, and show a desire to make parents happy.
  • Infants in this age group may resist going to bed and display their anger when they are unhappy.
  • Infants in this age group may cry when scolded.
  • Infants in this age group will repeat a caregiver’s action during play.

When to Contact a Pediatrician

Contact your child’s pediatrician if your child is showing any of the following signs or conditions:

  • Infant does not seem able to differentiate between family and strangers.
  • Infant does not babbles or put together syllables by ten months of age.
  • Infant does not reach out to grasp objects he or she is offered.
  • Infant is unable to stand when he or she is ten months of age.

One Year

Physical Milestones of a One Year Old

  • Child is more mobile. Child will be able to crawl, then walk.
  • Child is completely weaned soon after their first birthday.
  • Child will be able to hold and drink from a cup.
  • Child will be able to figure out how an object is stuck and how to maneuver it free.
  • Child will be able to stack two or three blocks.
  • Child will show an interest in using a spoon himself or herself.
  • Child is able to keep him self or herself awake. May resist bedtime.

Learning Milestones of a One Year Old

  • Child will become intrigued with animals and may imitate animal sounds.
  • Child listens closely to those around him or her and starts to imitate words.
  • Child will come to know what certain words mean and be able to retrieve objects when asked.
  • Child will be able to follow simple commands.
  • Child will start saying more words.
  • Child becomes more curious about his or her environment.
  • Child can answer questions that have a “yes” or “no” answer.

Emotional Milestones of a One Year Old

  • Child this age will cry when they feel parents or other caregivers are unhappy with them.
  • Child shows an interest in watching adults or older children write. Child may like to have chubby crayons and paper to scribble on.
  • Child is able to display affection to those he or she loves. Can give hugs and kisses upon request.
  • Child is able to display fear or anger at objects or individuals.
  • Child attaches himself or herself to a security object.
  • Child feels more secure when placed on a schedule, or routine.

When to Contact a Pediatrician

Contact your child’s pediatrician if your child is showing any of the following signs or conditions:

  • Child is unable to say a few words by 18 months of age.
  • Child is unable to point at pictures in a book.
  • Child is unresponsive to games such as peek-a-boo, pat a cake.

Two to Three Years Old

There are many milestones in physical, emotional and learning development during the ages of two and three. Each child is individual, and developmental milestones should not be compared. Children can reach milestones early or late.

Physical Milestones of a Two to Three Year Old

  • Child will be able to jump with both feet together.
  • Child will be able to hold “fat” crayons and scribble on paper.
  • Child will be able to run and play chase.
  • Child will be able to ride a tricycle.
  • Child will be able to dress him self or herself.
  • Child will be able to climb.
  • Child will start potty training.
  • Child can feed himself or herself.
  • All primary teeth should have emerged.

 Learning Milestones of a Two to Three Year Old

  • Child will be able to understand the differences in sizes and textures. He or she will be able to differentiate between large and small, short and tall, soft and hard.
  • Child will be able to say up to 50 words and make small sentences.
  • Child will be able to name up to five different body parts.
  • Child can tell you his or her name, as well as be able to identify some colors when asked.
  • Child loves to engage in pretend and make believe play.

 Emotional Milestones of a Two to Three Year Old

  • Child may be hard on himself or herself if he or she makes mistakes.
  • Child starts to label feelings, such as happy, sad, mad.
  • Child knows what he or she likes and dislikes.
  • Child may start having temper tantrums.
  • Child is interested in playing, or being around, other children his or her own age.
  • Children this age tend to excel and flourish with a routine.

When to Contact the Pediatrician

Contact your child’s pediatrician if your child is showing any of the following signs or conditions:

  • Child is unable to use a spoon.
  • Child cannot imitate speech.
  • Child is unable to make eye contact.
  • Child does not notice things in his or her environment, such as birds, butterflies, or flowers.
  • Child seems unaware of when he or she is soiling, and has shown no interest in potty training by his or her third birthday.

Three to Five Years Old

There are many milestones in physical, emotional and learning development during the ages of three and five years of age. Each child is individual, and developmental milestones should not be compared. Children can reach milestones early or late.

Physical Milestones of a Three to Five Year Old

  • Child will be able to run, jump and climb.
  • Child will be able to hold smaller crayons and utensils with more ease.
  • Child will start to become a expert on tricycles.
  • Child will be able to stand on his or her tippy-toes.
  • Child will be able to dress himself or herself, and have the urge to do buttons and zippers.

Learning Milestones of a Three to Five Year Old

  • Child will start drawing shapes and letters with encouragement.
  • Child will start thinking of things outside of himself or herself. For instance, the child may learn that a particular object is meant for pool play, or that a certain kind of ball is meant to be kicked, thrown or hit.
  • Child loves to listen to stories, and can even memorize short parts of a book.
  • Child may draw family members on paper.
  • Child will speak in sentences and know how to use plurals.

Emotional Milestones of a Three to Five Old

  • Child doesn’t get as frustrated as his or her vocabulary expands and he or she learns they can express thoughts, feelings and desires through speech.
  • Child starts to separate from caregivers and becomes more independent.
  • Child learns how to play with peers. Child learns the concept of taking turns, sharing and what is fair.
  • Child bonds with pets.
  • Child shows excitement over pending holidays.
  • Child is coming to know the difference between right and wrong on a small scale.
  • Child expresses love, or fear, of others openly.

When to Contact the Pediatrician

Contact your child’s pediatrician if your child is showing any of the following signs or conditions:

  • Child is unable to draw shapes or scribble on paper.
  • Child cannot speak in small sentences.
  • Child is not potty trained by four years of age, or has regressed.
  • Child is not able to run and jump.
  • Child cannot climb stairs with alternating feet.